Game Platform Types

GAME PLATFORM TYPES

Throughout this report I will talk about Game Platforms and Technologies, hopefully covering consoles, arcade, mobile and TV while I talk about some of their features and limitations.

  • 1972 saw the release of the Magnavox Odyssey
    • 1975 saw the release of the Magnavox Odyssey series, Home Pong and Binatone TV Master
      • 1976 saw the release of the Coleco Telstar
        • 1977 saw the release of the Nintendo Colour TV-Game

 

The “First Generation” included black and white (or limited colour) graphics, single channel audio, and entire game play areas filling one screen

  • 1976 saw the release of the Fairchild Channel F
    • 1977 saw the release of the Atari 2600 and the Bally Astrocade
      • 1978 saw the relese of the Magnavox Odyssey2
        • 1980 saw the release of the Intellivision
          • 1982 saw the release of hte Emerson Arcadia 2001, ColecoVision, Atari 5200 and the Vectrex
    • 1979 saw the release of hte Milton Bradley Microsvision handheld
      • 1980 saw the release of the Nintedo Game & WAtch handheld
        • 1981 saw the relese of the Entex Select-A-Game handheld
          • 1982 saw the release of the Entex Adventure Vision handheld
            • 1984 saw the release of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer

The “Second Generation” included microprocessor based game logic, AI simulation, ROM cartridges for storing games, game play areas spanning multiple screens, 160×192 sprites, graphics between 2-colour and 16-colour and three channel audio.

  • 1983 saw the release of the SG-1000 and the Nintendo Entertainment System
    • 1985 saw the release of the Sega Mark III/Master System
      • 1986 saw the release of the Atari 7800

The “Third Generation” included D-Pad game controllers, up to 100 sprites on screen, screen resolution of 256×240-320x200m 25 or 32 colour graphics and five channel audio.

 

  • 1987 saw the release of the PC-Engine/TurboGrafx-16
    • 1988 saw the release of the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis
      • 1990 saw the release of the Neo Geo AES
        • 1989 saw the release of the Game Boy and Atari Lynx handhelds
          • 1990 saw the release of the Sega Game Gear and TurboExpress handhelds

The “Fourth Generation” included 16-bit microprocessors, multibutton game controllers, parallax scrolling and layered tile map backgrounds with psuedo-3D scaling and rotation, 64×64 or 16×512 sprites, up to 16-bit colours, CD-ROM format and stereo audio.

  • 1993 saw the release of the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer and the Atari Jaguar
    • 1994 saw the release of the Sega Saturn and the PlayStation
      • 1996 saw the release of the Nintendo 64
        • 1995 saw the release of the Sega Nomad, R-Zone and Virtual Boy handhelds
          • 1996 saw the release of the Gameboy Pocket handheld
            • 1997 saw the release of the Game.Com handheld
              • 1998 saw the release of the Game Boy Light, Game Boy Colour, Neo Geo Pocket and Neo Geo Pocket Colour handhelds

The “Fifth Generation” included 3D polygonal graphics, CD-ROM, CD quality audio, FMVs, resolution of up to 480i and 576i, 24-bit true colour and features such as lighting, anti-aliasing and texture filtering.

  • 1998 saw the release of the Sega Dreamcast
    • 2000 saw the release of the PlayStation 2
      • 2001 saw the release of the GameCube and Xbox
  • 2001 saw the release of the Game Boy Advance handheld
    • 2003 saw the release of the Game Boy Advance SP, N-Gage and Tapwave Zodiac handhelds
      • 2005 saw the release of the Game Boy Micro handheld
        • 2005 saw the release of the Xbox 360
          • 2006 saw the release of the PlayStation 3 and Nintendo Wii
  • 2004 saw the release of the Nintendo DS and PSP handhelds
    • 2006 saw the release of the Nintedo DS Lite handheld
      • 2008 saw the release of the Nintendo DSi handheld
        • 2009 saw the release of the Nintendo DSi XL and PSP Go handhelds
      • 2012 saw the release of the Wii U
        • 2013 saw the release of the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One
    • 2011 saw the release of the Nintendo 3DS and PS Vita handhelds
      • 2012 saw the release of the Nintendo 3DS XL handheld
        • 2013 saw the release of the Nintendo 2DS handheld
          • 2015 saw the release of the New Nintendo 3DS and New Nintendo 3DS XL handhelds

ARCADE

Coin-op arcade machines originated with 1920s amusement parks and the 1930s saw the introduction of coin-op pinball machines. By 1977 most pinball machines in production used solid state electronics for operation and scoring. The first arcade emulator for PCs was released for Macs in 1994 and was followed up in 1995. Emulators for other hardware such as consoles or handhelds have become immensely popular, although sometimes technically difficult to execute.

While they were popular for a comunnity aspect with many gathering at arcade halls to see people play games like Donkey Kong and Space Invaders, the rise of more diverse and capable home consoles saw a decline in popularity for the arcade system and although they are still available today it tends to either be in dedicated retro arcades or cabinets that people have bought and have in their home.

Arcade Machine Features

  • Coin operation
  • Buttons & joystick controls
  • Standard screen and basic graphics
  • Limited hardware (fixed hardware but frequently upgraded)
  • Cooperative support
  • Advancement in technology and graphics as games demanded it

Arcade Machine Limitations

  • No online
  • Large physical size
  • Hardware dependent
  • Older hardware than consoles (due to reduction in arcade market)
  • Not many games being created nowadays
  • No saved games
  • Low quality graphics due to fixed and old hardware

One game per machine

MOBILE

Mobile devices are frequently used for gaming due to their portable and user-friendly nature however their games are not as advanced as PC and Console games with examples such as Angry Birds (12 million paid copies sold within first 12 months) and Flappy Bird (80 million downloads to date) proving that they have a wide range appeal. However while mobile devices become more powerful there remains a degree of cynicism about their long-term appeal for more AAA/hardcore games as while RPGs and FPS games are ported or made for devices like the iPhone, the big sellers on the mobile devices remain casual games and due to battery life etc they are not suited for long play in the way a PC or console is.

Mobile Device features

  • Simple and accessible controls
  • Huge range of games and apps
  • Apps mean you can do a huge range of things on a single device
  • Range of prices mean apps and games etc can be cheap and accessible

Mobile Device Limitations

  • Price of mobile devices can be very expensive
  • Hardware limits size and graphics of the game
  • The Games and hardware become outdated quickly compared to PC and further iterations

TV

TV games are incredibly limited. Although they can have online capabilities due to SmartTVs etc the hardware is not built for games. While they are obviously a conduit for console or PC games being displayed on a TV, their ability to play games is something of a novelty as it is not something they were designed to do. Ultimately games playable tend to be small games made by the manufacters like Sony or LG etc or the service providers like Sky or Virgin Media to serve an advertising purpose rather than a dozen(s) of hour long experience you may get on console, PC or handheld.

TV Limitations

  • TVs are not designed to remotely run games
  • Lack of gaming-orientated hardware limits development
  • TVs are very expensive and thus there is a cost barrier involved
  • Not portable as TVs are typically very heavy
  • TV remote not designed to play games

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Game Platform Types

  1. Pingback: Game Platform Types | BossDarkseid

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